06.19.17 Some Things I Learned About Dementia – Two Great Videos

These two videos were found on Alzheimer’s and Dementia Weekly, a wonderful website with lots of information helpful to all. http://www.alzheimersweekly.com/

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SON, WHAT IS THAT?

This short film will move you in a wonderful way: a son, a father with dementia & love’s incredible power.

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WHILE HE STILL KNOWS WHO I AM, By Kenny Chesney

When my father was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s, I was determined he would not forget me … or I him. This is a grand tribute to all who are living with and dealing with Alzheimer’s disease.

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PERSONAL NOTE:  I am in a really good place right now, brain wise!   I’ve been taken off of several medicines including Aricept and Namenda (Dementia medicine) to see if that is the cause of some lightheadedness I’ve been experiencing.   So far the lightheadedness is significantly decreased, so now the goal is to determine which medicine was causing it.

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Please come back next time when I’ll share more topics about dementia from myself or from this source.  If you want to get an email whenever I post a blog (I write about other things, not just Alzheimer’s) find the “FOLLOW” box which is usually to the right hand side somewhere, enter your email and respond when the confirmation email is sent to you.

If you are in need of prayer for yourself, in your role as a caregiver, or if you have any specific questions please send me a comment with whatever information you want to share or ask about. I’ll say again that I’m not expert, but I probably experienced with my mom a lot of things you’re going through and will try my best to help. If I don’t know the answer I will tell you I don’t know. I’ll never judge, I’ve been judged enough to last a life time and would never do that to someone else. My email address is rosalyn@selu.edu if that is an easier way to communicate.

Until next time,

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05.12.17 Some Things I Learned About Dementia – 7 Ways to Respond to Mean Dementia Behavior

Another very helpful article from Daily Caring.  This article, http://dailycaring.com/7-ways-to-respond-to-mean-dementia-behavior/?FBAd199=Alz20170509Convert, and many more can be found on their website at http://www.dailycaring.com.  Be sure to click on the red links to take you to even more helpful information.

Seniors with dementia sometimes say hurtful things

When you’re caring for an older adult with Alzheimer’s or dementia, they might make mean comments, use hurtful words, or accuse you of terrible (and untrue) things. It’s devastating to hear!

The most important thing to remember is that the disease is causing the behavior. Your senior isn’t saying these things to purposely hurt you.

But trying to keep that in mind while they’re yelling isn’t helpful enough. We’ve got 7 effective tips to help you manage this difficult behavior and reduce the stress and resentment it causes.

Understand why someone with dementia is saying mean things

First, it’s important to understand why this hurtful behavior is happening. Mean comments or hurtful accusations could be triggered by something in their environment that causes discomfort, pain, fear, anxiety, helplessness, confusion, or frustration.

Dementia is a brain disease that causes parts of the brain to shrink and lose their function. Different parts control different functions like memory, personality, behavior, and speech. Dementia also damages the ability to control impulses, which means actions aren’t intentional.

Even though it’s difficult, do your best to remember that they truly don’t mean the mean things they say. This behavior often happens because they’re unable to express what’s actually bothering them. Accepting that they’re not doing this on purpose reduces your stress and makes the behavior easier to manage.

7 ways to manage mean dementia behavior

1. Calm the situation down
The first thing to do is bring the tension level down. You can do this by limiting the distractions in the room, like turning off the TV or asking others to leave.

If you stay calm, they’re more likely to calm down. It might help to count to 10 or even leave the room for a short time to cool down. Repeat to yourself “it’s the disease” as a reminder that they’re not intentionally doing this.

If the current activity seemed to cause the agitation, try shifting to a more pleasant, calming activity. Or, try soft music or a gentle massage.

2. Comfort and reassure while checking for causes of discomfort or fear
Take a deep breath, don’t argue, and use a calm, soothing voice to reassure and comfort your older adult. It also helps to speak slowly and use short, direct sentences.

Then, check for possible causes of agitation or fear, like:

  • Pain or discomfort
  • Signs of overstimulation
  • Feeling disturbed by strange surroundings
  • Being overwhelmed by complicated tasks
  • Frustration because of the inability to communicate

It also helps to focus on their emotions rather than their specific words or actions. Look for the feelings behind what they’re doing as a way to identify the cause.

3. Keep track of and avoid possible triggers
Whenever difficult behavior comes up, write down what happened, the time, and the date in a dedicated notebook. Also think about what was going on just before the behavior started and write that down as a possible trigger. Having everything in one notebook helps you find possible causes for the behavior.

For example, if your notes show that your older adult gets angry and starts calling you names around 4pm on most days, it could be because they haven’t eaten since noon and they’re hungry. They may not realize it or don’t know how to ask for food. To test your theory, try giving them a snack around 3:30pm to see if that helps prevent the outbursts.

4. Check for a UTI
A urinary tract infection (UTI) can put a lot of stress on your older adult’s immune system. That can cause sudden, unexplained behavior changes like difficult behaviors, more agitation, or being less responsive than usual.

5. Consider an adult day program
You might also consider enrolling your senior in an adult day program. These are places where your older adult would go for a half or full day of activities and socialization.

Interacting with other people and participating in a variety of enjoyable activities can reduce stress and help them sleep better. That can improve their overall behavior and reduce their need to act out.

Find a local adult day center through the Eldercare Locator (also at 1-800-677-1116) or through your local Area Agency on Aging.

6. Join a caregiver support group
Caregiver support groups are filled with people who really understand what you’re going through. It gives you an important outlet for stress — you can vent your frustrations so it will be easier to stay calm when your senior is being hurtful.

7. Lean on family, friends, and other help to get a break
Always being around the same person can make anyone annoyed and short-tempered. This goes for both you and your older adult.

Taking some time away can help both of you. Ask family and friends to take over for a few hours or hire an in-home caregiver. Taking regular breaks gives you a chance to take care of yourself and gives you both a little time away from each other.

Bottom line

Alzheimer’s and dementia are terrible brain diseases that can cause mean and hurtful behavior. Take a deep breath, remind yourself that it’s not personal, address immediate discomfort or fear, and try to find the cause behind the behavior.

Next, look for long-term solutions that will help you get the support and rest you need to keep your cool in tough situations like these.

ROSALYN NOTE:  I have been working on information on a form of dementia known as Frontotemporal Degeneration Dementia.  That is part of what I have.  It’s not well known, nor understood by most folks.  I’ll publish a series of blog posts related to that in the near future.

I will also continue sharing information I find on the internet that I believe may be helpful. If you want to get an email each time I post a blog (I write about other things, not just Alzheimer’s) find the “FOLLOW” box which is usually to the right hand side somewhere, enter your email and respond when the confirmation email is sent to you.

If you are in need of prayer for yourself, in your role as a caregiver, or if you have any specific questions please send me a comment with whatever information you want to share or ask about. I’ll say again that I’m not expert, but I probably experienced with my mom a lot of things you’re going through and will try my best to help. If I don’t know the answer I will tell you I don’t know. I’ll never judge, I’ve been judged enough to last a life time and would never do that to someone else. My email address is rosalyn@selu.edu if that is an easier way to communicate.

Until next time,

cooltext1838781539

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04.11.17 – Some Things I Learned About Dementia – How Loved Ones with Dementia Benefit from Our Visits

Another great article from Alzheimers.net. This one is about the benefits to someone with Dementia when someone visits them. I, again, encourage you to click on the links in the article to read additional information. These links provide excellent additional information that isn’t covered in this brief post.

From my experience with mama, when she had visitors her whole expression and level of happiness went up. The most amazing time was when her friend Ms. Viola came to visit. Somehow their long time friendship sparked something that awakened mama’s previous self. She talked, she laughed, she was my mama of her younger years and I will always be thankful for that day and that visit. If your parent has older friends make an effort to get them to visit, it will make such a difference. Younger children also seem to awaken something that is precious to see.

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Caring for and visiting with someone who has Alzheimer’s disease can be emotionally and physically draining. In a recent survey, over 40% of people reported thinking it was “pointless” to stay in contact with a loved one in advanced dementia. How Loved Ones with Alzheimer's Benefit from Our Visits

However, the Alzheimer’s Society is encouraging family and friends to stay active in the lives of their loved ones, citing a strong emotional memory and long lasting benefits from socializing with loved ones.

Visits with Loved Ones with Dementia/Alzheimer’s

A recent survey found that 42% of the public think it’s pointless to stay in contact with loved ones who have Alzheimer’s after they are unable to recognize the faces of family and friends. Alzheimer’s advocates and researchers caution against this line of thinking, saying that even as the disease progresses, people with advanced dementia can still hold an emotional memory, meaning that they remember how something made them feel long after they have forgotten they event that brought those feelings.

After the celebration of the holidays and more time spent with family, people with Alzheimer’s can feel especially lonely in the beginning months of the new year. However, spending time with a loved one who has Alzheimer’s is important, even as the disease progresses. Chief Executive of Alzheimer’s Society Jeremy Hughes stated:

“After spending time with friends and family over the festive period, New Year can be a bleak and lonely time for people with dementia and their carers. It’s so important for people with dementia to feel connected throughout the year. Spending time with loved ones and taking part in meaningful activities can have a powerful and positive impact, even if they don’t remember the event itself. We’re urging people to get in touch with us and find out how we can help you stay connected.”

Another survey found that more than 50% of people with dementia were not participating in social activities and 64% said they felt isolated after receiving their diagnosis.

5 Ways Loved Ones with Dementia/Alzheimer’s Benefit from Visits

Research shows that even though a person with dementia may no longer recognize a loved one, their time together has a lasting, positive impact. Here are 5 reasons to continue visiting your loved one with dementia, even after it seems their dementia is too advanced to benefit from time together.

  1. They may recognize you even if they can not express it.
  2. Even if they are unable to remember your relationship, they may remember how often you visit.
  3. They may enjoy visits even if they can not remember your name or your relationship to them.
  4. Opportunities to socialize and visits can put your loved one in a better mood and help them relax.
  5. People with Alzheimer’s still have emotional memory, remembering how an event has made them feel after forgetting the details of the event.

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Rosalyn’s Notes: Some additional links to web pages concerning visiting the elderly with dementia:

http://www.aplaceformom.com/blog/2013-12-10-reasons-for-visiting-loved-ones/

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-1265547/Why-Alzheimer-victims-DO-feel-benefit-visits.html

https://www.alz.org/documents/heartofamerica/Visiting_Someone_with_Alzheimers.pdf

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Please come back next time when I’ll share more topics about dementia. If you want to get an email each time I post a blog (I write about other things, not just Alzheimer’s) find the “FOLLOW” box which is usually to the right hand side somewhere, enter your email and respond when the confirmation email is sent to you.

If you are in need of prayer for yourself, in your role as a caregiver, or if you have any specific questions please send me a comment with whatever information you want to share or ask about. I’ll say again that I’m not expert, but I probably experienced with my mom a lot of things you’re going through and will try my best to help. If I don’t know the answer I will tell you I don’t know. I’ll never judge, I’ve been judged enough to last a life time and would never do that to someone else. My email address is rosalyn@selu.edu if that is an easier way to communicate.

Until next time,

 

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04.06.17 Some Things I Learned About Dementia – 8 Things People with Dementia wish you wouldn’t say.

Speaking to or about a dementia patient as if he or she is not really a person is a pitfall many of us fall into. When our parents and grandparents lose their memory and, often, certain aspects of their personalities, it’s hard to regard them as the same people we once knew. It’s also nearly impossible to keep from correcting someone who has dementia, it’s just our nature to want to help “heal” our loved one’s memory by fixing the errors we hear in their words.

However, just because someone has dementia doesn’t mean they don’t have feelings. So think twice before you make any of these comments that may unintentionally cause more harm than good to a person with dementia.

8. “You said that already.”

You don’t really get how this disease works, do you?

medication blues

7. “Do you remember me?”

Way to put a person on the spot. Maybe I do and maybe I don’t. What’s it to you?

wrinkled face of senior woman

6. “Use your words.”

First of all, I’m not a three-year-old throwing a tantrum. I’m not refusing to use words. Sometimes I just CAN’T use words. If you know what I’m trying to say, why can’t you meet me halfway?

A grumpy old man

5. “No, no, I’m not Meredith.”

Are you sure you’re not Meredith? You look like Meredith. Mary, maybe? Marie? Emily? Can’t you just be Meredith for the day so I can be done guessing?

granportrait 12

 4. “That’s not what happened.”

Well then you tell the darn story. Am I not allowed to talk now just because I can’t keep my facts straight?

Old Man in Sunglasses

3. “Oh, actually, so-and-so passed away.”

Well thanks for raining down that giant tidal wave of grief on me in that blasted matter-of-fact tone. This is fantastic.

elderly woman

2. “I know you probably don’t remember, but…”

Again, thank you. I’m glad we’ve gotten past that murky point where we weren’t sure what I remembered and what I didn’t. Just assuming I don’t know what you’re talking about is much easier.

Elderly woman sticking out her tongue

1. “So what have you been doing lately?”

Skydiving in Egypt. Making bombs in my bathtub. Learning to juggle maracas while doing a handstand on horseback. Come on. Seriously? I have no idea what I’ve been doing lately besides sitting in this chair watching daytime soaps. Can’t you think of anything more interesting to add to this conversation?

Loneliness

So basically, try not to make a person with Alzheimer’s feel like they’re on trial or like they can’t do anything right or like you don’t care what they say. If you’re wondering what you can say to a person with Alzheimer’s, we have a few tips. Because Alzheimer’s patients tend to remember feelings better than actual facts, it’s more important to have a conversation that makes the person feel good than one that is completely accurate. Avoid correcting what they say and focus on things they’re more likely to remember, usually the more distant past. Ask them about their childhood or early adulthood, when they met their spouse, what their children were like as little kids, etcetera. And just go with the flow when they don’t make perfect sense.

By Elizabeth Nelson  from http://blog.thealzheimerssite.com

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Please come back next time when I’ll share more topics about dementia. If you want to get an email each time I post a blog (I write about other things, not just Alzheimer’s) find the “FOLLOW” box which is usually to the right hand side somewhere, enter your email and respond when the confirmation email is sent to you.

If you are in need of prayer for yourself, in your role as a caregiver, or if you have any specific questions please send me a comment with whatever information you want to share or ask about. I’ll say again that I’m not expert, but I probably experienced with my mom a lot of things you’re going through and will try my best to help. If I don’t know the answer I will tell you I don’t know. I’ll never judge, I’ve been judged enough to last a life time and would never do that to someone else. My email address is rosalyn@selu.edu if that is an easier way to communicate.

Until next time,

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03.17.17 Some Things I Learned About Dementia – Making a Memory Box

This article is from Alzheimers.net.  There are a couple of links in it that I encourage you to follow for more information about Memory Boxes.  When mama was at Sunrise Assisted Living Center in Hammond they had a version of memory boxes using a shadow box on the wall outside the door to their little apartment.  It helped the residents know which door was theirs.  Mama loved to stand in front of hers and connect with things she remembered that was in the box.  It was a tiny version of this and not nearly as helpful as what this article encourages caregivers or families to put together for their loved one.

For loved ones, parents or seniors with Alzheimer’s disease, a memory box can help recall events and people from the past. These memories can stimulate the senior, prompting conversation with loved ones. 5 Reasons to Make a Memory Box for Alzheimer's

Whether a family photo, newspaper clipping or other prop; memory boxes hold items that bring us back to a moment in time that we hold dear. When a senior who has Alzheimer’s opens a memory box, it can stir thoughts of happy moments in life and give that person something to talk about.

Reasons to Create a Memory Box for Alzheimer’s

Memory boxes can link loved ones to their identity, with keepsakes emphasizing an overall holiday, person or theme that lifts the senior’s spirit. Though it will take time to find which keepsakes to store in the memory box, it is worth the effort.

Here are five reasons to make a memory box for a senior loved one with Alzheimer’s:

  1. Exercise, touch and other senses used in the creation of a memory box will become more important for a loved one to rely on as Alzheimer’s progresses.
  2. Fond memories of a senior’s history, personal interests and youth can be explored.
  3. Memory boxes can inspire conversation with caregivers, children or grandchildren.
  4. More insight into your loved one and their past will be gained. When you search for keepsakes to include in a memory box, you may find special items you did not realize the senior still had or was interested in.
  5. Spurred creativity from the creation of a memory box. The senior may be inspired to create another box about a different life event or memory.

Ways to Make a Memory Box

A memory box can be as decorative or as simple as you like. It can be a plastic bin or a shoe box, whichever you prefer. Ideally, it will be easy to access and lift, store a number of items of reasonable shapes and sizes, and fit on your loved one’s lap or a small table.

If the memory box has compartments, make sure they suit the senior’s dexterity and that the senior can open the memory box easily.

Learn more from these tips about ways to choose keepsakes for your memory box:

Choosing Keepsakes

Items stored in a memory box should be personal, like a baby’s toy or postcard. The memory box should reflect the senior’s interests or a moment in history that has meaning to that individual.

When you choose keepsakes for the memory box, consider:

  • Safety: Avoid heavy or sharp items.
  • Significance: Focus on items linked to positive memories.
  • Texture: Items should be easy to handle; texture itself can help stir memories.
  • Uniqueness: If an item is irreplaceable, leave it out.

Bear in mind that a loved one may not recognize items right away or understand why they were included. So, consider labeling each item with a sticker or tag. You can also list the items on a piece of paper, and write a phrase or sentence about each one.

Keepsake Ideas

Here are some suggestions for keepsakes you might include in a senior’s memory box:

  • A baby toy
  • A baseball or cards
  • A keychain
  • A letter
  • A recipe
  • Artwork by children or grandchildren
  • Dried flowers
  • Family photos
  • Postcards
  • Sheet music
  • Vacation souvenirs

You can create multiple memory boxes with different themes with your loved one – maybe one could hold memories of children and another of a favorite hobby, for instance. The keepsakes do not have to fit into a single box.

When you open the memory box with your senior loved one, ask the senior to share his or her memories with you. You may find that an item that was meant to stir a certain memory brings on another. Or, it could inspire a waterfall of thoughts and conversation, leaving you with new, lasting memories of your senior loved one.

Rosalyn’s note:  Here are several versions of Memory Boxes I found on the internet.  There is no one way to make them so I thought showing several would be helpful.

First photo shows some labels that could be used:

  I like that this one includes a family tree.  I think that is an excellent idea.

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PERSONAL NOTE:  To my sons and husband – I really, really, really want one of these for when I am at that stage.  I’m starting to make a list of what I’d like in my memory box to help you with this.  Chip has a large box with lots of things in it that would be a good start – just sayin!!!   Please make sure you include only happy memories  Love you all!

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Please come back next time when I’ll share more topics about dementia. If you want to get an email each time I post a blog (I write about other things, not just Alzheimer’s) find the “FOLLOW” box which is usually to the right hand side somewhere, enter your email and respond when the confirmation email is sent to you.

If you are in need of prayer for yourself, in your role as a caregiver, or if you have any specific questions please send me a comment with whatever information you want to share or ask about. I’ll say again that I’m not expert, but I probably experienced with my mom a lot of things you’re going through and will try my best to help. If I don’t know the answer I will tell you I don’t know. I’ll never judge, I’ve been judged enough to last a life time and would never do that to someone else. My email address is rosalyn@selu.edu if that is an easier way to communicate.

Until next time,

cooltext1838781539

Click on the links below to go there!

Dora and the Explorers published randomly

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02.23.17 Some Things I Learned About Dementia – Devoted Son Finds A Clever Way To Help His Dad Battle Alzheimer’s

As Alzheimer’s took hold of Ted McDermott, he started forgetting his family. He also started getting violent. His family watched on, heartbroken. But then his son, Mac, had a brilliant idea. Ted has always been a talented singer. So, his devoted son uses music to battle his dad’s Alzheimer’s!

God gifted Ted with a beautiful singing voice, something he’s always treasured. There was a time when Ted traveled around Britain, singing in night clubs and pubs. When he finally settled down and started working in a factory, he continued to sing on the side.

An Awful DiagnosisIn 2013, Ted and his family got terrible news. Ted was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease. It progresses over time, causing problems with memory, thinking and behavior.

As the disease took hold, Ted started forgetting his family.

“In the last few years his memory has deteriorated a lot – often not recognizing me as his son,” his son Mac explained. “It’s a horrible illness.”

The memory loss was tough. But the outbursts only made things worse.

“The more the Alzheimer’s kicked in, the more Dad became violent – both physically and verbally. It was incredibly difficult to manage, and terrifying at times,” Mac said.

Then, one day, Mac had an idea.

“My dad’s been a singer all his life and entertainer all his life,” Mac explained. “He’s a real character and he loves singing. He’s got a good voice.”

Ted has music in his bones. So, Mac reason that maybe it would reach him in a way no one else could.

When Mac noticed Ted starting to zone out, he put on some of his favorite songs. Just as he’d hoped, Ted sang along, remembering the lyrics!

Mac was on to something. And now the devoted son uses music to battle his dad’s Alzheimer’s!

An Internet Star Is Born

Mac found that listening to music with his dad works wonders.

“When we’ve got him singing again he’s back in the room. It’s these moments that we treasure,” he said.

Ted became known on Facebook as The Songaminute Man. Mac started filming these special moments in a James Corden Carpool Karaoke style.

Listen to Ted sing by clicking HERE:

The videos of the sweet son driving his beloved dad around while the two belt out melodies together quickly went viral. Ted was officially a singing sensation!

Thanks to all the hype the father and son duo received online, a dream came true for the pair. Record executive Alexander Van Ingen spotted the videos and quickly signed Ted as an artist. He described Ted as “truly remarkable for any singer, let alone one 80 years of age.”

Ted will soon release his first single, a cover of Frank Sinatra’s You Make Me Feel So Young, to raise money for the Alzheimer’s Society. And Mac can’t believe it.

“It’s amazing to think he has a single coming out,” he said.

Music is a gift from God, and it’s amazing to see this gift used to heal!

From GodVine at http://www.godvine.com/

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Please come back next time when I’ll share more topics about dementia. If you want to get an email whenever I post a blog (I write about other things, not just Alzheimer’s) find the “FOLLOW” box which is usually to the right hand side somewhere, enter your email and respond when the confirmation email is sent to you.

If you are in need of prayer for yourself, in your role as a caregiver, or if you have any specific questions please send me a comment with whatever information you want to share or ask about. I’ll say again that I’m not expert, but I probably experienced with my mom a lot of things you’re going through and will try my best to help. If I don’t know the answer I will tell you I don’t know. I’ll never judge, I’ve been judged enough to last a life time and would never do that to someone else. My email address is rosalyn@selu.edu if that is an easier way to communicate.

I am creating my own graphics with scriptures.  When I can, those will be the ones I’m sharing here.  Another way to help expand the use of my brain to keep it ship shape!

Until next time,

psalm-95-1

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02.10.17 Some Things I Learned About Dementia – The Positive Effect of Therapy Dolls for Dementia

dolls for dementia

Baby dolls for Alzheimer’s patients are therapeutic

A helpful, non-drug way to calm and soothe seniors with Alzheimer’s or dementia is to give them a soft, lifelike baby doll to cuddle. These therapy dolls can even be effective in calming older adults with severe agitation or other significant behavioral issues.

Why therapy dolls for dementia work

Therapy dolls help seniors feel useful and needed and give them something positive to focus on. Similar to the effect of soft toys like stuffed animals, hugging something soft helps someone with dementia soothe themselves.

Another reason therapy dolls are helpful is that they bring back happy memories of early parenthood for both women and men. Having a child to care for can also ease feelings of isolation and sadness. After all, most of us have seen or experienced the way that interacting with real babies can quickly lift spirits and calm nerves.

Many older adults will enjoy rocking and cuddling their doll. Some even adopt the baby as their own and make caring for it part of their daily routine.

Tips for introducing doll therapy to your senior

The best approach is to casually introduce the doll to your senior and let them decide if they like it or not. If they have no interest in the doll, don’t make an issue out of it. They may change their minds in the future so you could always give it another try in a few weeks or months.

A few tips:

  1. Don’t act like the doll is a doll, refer to it as a baby and treat it like a real child.
  2. Get a lifelike doll, but one that doesn’t cry – that could be upsetting.
  3. Don’t force it, allow your senior to get to know the doll slowly.

For a real-life example, click here to find out how one woman slowly introduced a lifelike doll to her mom and used it to ease her anxiety without making her feel stressed about being responsible for it. Try it out, see how your older adult responds, and be flexible.

Some caregivers find dolls controversial

We’ve heard from many caregivers who say their older adults are much calmer and happier now that they have their own baby doll. They’re relieved to have found a non-drug solution that eases their senior’s dementia symptoms.

Some people are concerned that giving their older adult a doll would be demeaning or patronizing. But when someone has dementia, helping them feel safe and happy in their current reality is the top priority. That’s why we sometimes need to consider unconventional approaches like baby dolls, fidget blankets, and other simple activities and toys.

Of course, the decision is entirely up to you since you know your older adult best. If you think a therapy doll might help them feel better and enjoy life more, why not give it a try? It’s an inexpensive “treatment” with no side effects.

6 soft, lifelike doll options

By DailyCaring Editorial Team http://dailycaring.com

On a personal note, Mama had two beanie babies she loved.  Dementia folks have hands that fidget.  The beanie babies gave her fidgeting hands something to love.  We even buried her with those beanie babies.  If I am ever at this point I really want a baby doll to love.  A couple of beanie babies would be a nice first step!

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Please come back next time when I’ll share more topics about dementia. If you want to get an email whenever I post a blog (I write about other things, not just Alzheimer’s) find the “FOLLOW” box which is usually to the right hand side somewhere, enter your email and respond when the confirmation email is sent to you.

If you are in need of prayer for yourself, in your role as a caregiver, or if you have any specific questions please send me a comment with whatever information you want to share or ask about. I’ll say again that I’m not expert, but I probably experienced with my mom a lot of things you’re going through and will try my best to help. If I don’t know the answer I will tell you I don’t know. I’ll never judge, I’ve been judged enough to last a life time and would never do that to someone else. My email address is rosalyn@selu.edu if that is an easier way to communicate.

Until next time,

2-corinthians-5-17

cooltext1838781539

Click on the links below to go there!

Dora and the Explorers published randomly

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03.02.17 Some Things I Learned About Dementia – Not Exactly a Walk in the Park: A Peek into Life with Dementia/Alzheimer’s

I  found this on http://blog.thealzheimerssite.com. From experience, I can say this is very much what life in the world of dementia can be like.

Have you ever wondered what it would be like to havedementia? Maybe you’d like to be able to see the world through the eyes of someone you know who has Alzheimer’s to help you better understand and care for them. Or maybe you’re just passionately curious about the many unique perspectives this world has to offer, one of which is the viewpoint of a person with severe memory problems.

In the video below, you can step into the shoes of a woman with Alzheimer’s and go for a little walk.

One shocking thing we learned in the video is that the woman’s memory seems to fade and return (or vice versa) within seconds. One moment she is lucid and independent and decides to head home on her own by way of a short cut. The next moment, she turns the corner and is completely lost and terrified. Her physical reaction to the sudden memory loss is eye-opening.

Her comment at 2:20 is what really got us thinking about what it’s like to have Alzheimer’s.

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Please come back next time when I’ll share more topics about dementia.  If you want to receive an email whenever I post a blog (I write about other things, not just Alzheimer’s) find the “FOLLOW” box which is usually to the right hand side somewhere, enter your email and respond when the confirmation email is sent to you.

If you are in need of prayer for yourself, in your role as a caregiver, or if you have any specific questions please send me a comment with whatever information you want to share or ask about. I’ll say again that I’m not expert, but I probably experienced with my mom a lot of things you’re going through and will try my best to help. If I don’t know the answer I will tell you I don’t know. I’ll never judge, I’ve been judged enough to last a life time and would never do that to someone else. My email address is rosalyn@selu.edu if that is an easier way to communicate.

Until next time,

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cooltext1838781539

Click on the links below to go there!

Dora and the Explorers published randomly

Wacky Wonderful Wednesdays published every Wednesday

02.01.17 Some Things I Learned About Dementia – 8 Things People with Dementia Wish You Wouldn’t Say

singleactofkindnessquoteameliaearhartThis article was found on http://blog.thealzheimerssite.com/.  There is lots of information about dementia there.  Check it out for yourself! I found this information to be quite true and helpful, I hope it will help you as well.

Speaking to or about an Alzheimer’s patient as if he or she is not really a person is a pitfall many of us fall into. When our parents and grandparents lose their memory and, often, certain aspects of their personalities, it’s hard to regard them as the same people we once knew. It’s also nearly impossible to keep from correcting someone who has Alzheimer’s; it’s just our nature to want to help “heal” our loved one’s memory by fixing the errors we hear in their words.

However, just because someone has Alzheimer’s doesn’t mean they don’t have feelings. So think twice before you make any of these comments that may unintentionally cause more harm than good to a person with Alzheimer’s.

8. “You said that already.”

You don’t really get how this disease works, do you?

medication blues

7. “Do you remember me?”

Way to put a person on the spot. Maybe I do and maybe I don’t. What’s it to you?

wrinkled face of senior woman

6. “Use your words.”

First of all, I’m not a three-year-old throwing a tantrum. I’m not refusing to use words. Sometimes I just CAN’T use words. If you know what I’m trying to say, why can’t you meet me halfway?

A grumpy old man

5. “No, no, I’m not Meredith.”

Are you sure you’re not Meredith? You look like Meredith. Mary, maybe? Marie? Emily? Can’t you just be Meredith for the day so I can be done guessing?

granportrait 12

Well then you tell the darn story. Am I not allowed to talk now just because I can’t keep my facts straight?

Old Man in Sunglasses

3. “Oh, actually, so-and-so passed away.”

Well thanks for raining down that giant tidal wave of grief on me in that blasted matter-of-fact tone. This is fantastic.

elderly woman

 2. “I know you probably don’t remember, but…”

Again, thank you. I’m glad we’ve gotten past that murky point where we weren’t sure what I remembered and what I didn’t. Just assuming I don’t know what you’re talking about is much easier.

Elderly woman sticking out her tongue

1. “So what have you been doing lately?”

Skydiving in Egypt. Making bombs in my bathtub. Learning to juggle maracas while doing a handstand on horseback. Come on. Seriously? I have no idea what I’ve been doing lately besides sitting in this chair watching daytime soaps. Can’t you think of anything more interesting to add to this conversation?

Loneliness

So basically, try not to make a person with Alzheimer’s feel like they’re on trial or like they can’t do anything right or like you don’t care what they say. If you’re wondering what you can say to a person with Alzheimer’s, we have a few tips. Because Alzheimer’s patients tend to remember feelings better than actual facts, it’s more important to have a conversation that makes the person feel good than one that is completely accurate. Avoid correcting what they say and focus on things they’re more likely to remember, usually the more distant past. Ask them about their childhood or early adulthood, when they met their spouse, what their children were like as little kids, etcetera. And just go with the flow when

they don’t make perfect sense.

This article originally appeared on ScottSlayton.net. 17

Please come back next time when I’ll share more topics about dementia from various sources. If you want to get an email whenever I post a blog (I write about other things, not just Dementia/Alzheimer’s) find the “FOLLOW” box which is usually to the right hand side somewhere, enter your email and respond when the confirmation email is sent to you.

If you are in need of prayer for yourself, in your role as a caregiver, or if you have any specific questions please send me a comment with whatever information you want to share or ask about. I’ll say again that I’m not expert, but I probably experienced with my mom a lot of things you’re going through and will try my best to help. If I don’t know the answer I will tell you I don’t know. I’ll never judge, I’ve been judged enough to last a life time and would never do that to someone else. My email address is rosalyn@selu.edu if that is an easier way to communicate.

Until next time,

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cooltext1838781539

Click on the links below to go there!

Dora and the Explorers published randomly

Wacky Wonderful Wednesdays published every Wednesday