02.23.17 Some Things I Learned About Dementia – Devoted Son Finds A Clever Way To Help His Dad Battle Alzheimer’s

As Alzheimer’s took hold of Ted McDermott, he started forgetting his family. He also started getting violent. His family watched on, heartbroken. But then his son, Mac, had a brilliant idea. Ted has always been a talented singer. So, his devoted son uses music to battle his dad’s Alzheimer’s!

God gifted Ted with a beautiful singing voice, something he’s always treasured. There was a time when Ted traveled around Britain, singing in night clubs and pubs. When he finally settled down and started working in a factory, he continued to sing on the side.

An Awful Diagnosis In 2013, Ted and his family got terrible news. Ted was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease. It progresses over time, causing problems with memory, thinking and behavior.

As the disease took hold, Ted started forgetting his family.

“In the last few years his memory has deteriorated a lot – often not recognizing me as his son,” his son Mac explained. “It’s a horrible illness.”

The memory loss was tough. But the outbursts only made things worse.

“The more the Alzheimer’s kicked in, the more Dad became violent – both physically and verbally. It was incredibly difficult to manage, and terrifying at times,” Mac said.

Then, one day, Mac had an idea.

“My dad’s been a singer all his life and entertainer all his life,” Mac explained. “He’s a real character and he loves singing. He’s got a good voice.”

Ted has music in his bones. So, Mac reason that maybe it would reach him in a way no one else could.

When Mac noticed Ted starting to zone out, he put on some of his favorite songs. Just as he’d hoped, Ted sang along, remembering the lyrics!

Mac was on to something. And now the devoted son uses music to battle his dad’s Alzheimer’s!

An Internet Star Is Born

Mac found that listening to music with his dad works wonders.

“When we’ve got him singing again he’s back in the room. It’s these moments that we treasure,” he said.

Ted became known on Facebook as The Songaminute Man. Mac started filming these special moments in a James Corden Carpool Karaoke style.

Listen to Ted sing by clicking HERE:

The videos of the sweet son driving his beloved dad around while the two belt out melodies together quickly went viral. Ted was officially a singing sensation!

Thanks to all the hype the father and son duo received online, a dream came true for the pair. Record executive Alexander Van Ingen spotted the videos and quickly signed Ted as an artist. He described Ted as “truly remarkable for any singer, let alone one 80 years of age.”

Ted will soon release his first single, a cover of Frank Sinatra’s You Make Me Feel So Young, to raise money for the Alzheimer’s Society. And Mac can’t believe it.

“It’s amazing to think he has a single coming out,” he said.

Music is a gift from God, and it’s amazing to see this gift used to heal!

From GodVine at http://www.godvine.com/

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Please come back next time when I’ll share more topics about dementia. If you want to get an email whenever I post a blog (I write about other things, not just Alzheimer’s) find the “FOLLOW” box which is usually to the right hand side somewhere, enter your email and respond when the confirmation email is sent to you.

If you are in need of prayer for yourself, in your role as a caregiver, or if you have any specific questions please send me a comment with whatever information you want to share or ask about. I’ll say again that I’m not expert, but I probably experienced with my mom a lot of things you’re going through and will try my best to help. If I don’t know the answer I will tell you I don’t know. I’ll never judge, I’ve been judged enough to last a life time and would never do that to someone else. My email address is rosalyn@selu.edu if that is an easier way to communicate.

I am creating my own graphics with scriptures.  When I can, those will be the ones I’m sharing here.  Another way to help expand the use of my brain to keep it ship shape!

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02.10.17 Some Things I Learned About Dementia – The Positive Effect of Therapy Dolls for Dementia original – reblogged 12.26.17

Tuesday, December 26, 2017 – While reviewing the original blog below I did some research into this and found an article titled:

“Grandmother with dementia reacts with sheer joy as her granddaughter places a child’s doll in her arms in a touching video that will move you to tears.”

I recommend that in addition to reading the blog below, you check the link below and read that article too. http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-3379099/Grandmother-dementia-reacts-sheer-joy-s-given-child-s-baby-doll.html

Original blog published 02.10.17 –  On a personal note, Mama had two beanie babies she loved.  Dementia folks have fidgety hands.  The beanie babies gave her fidgeting hands something to love.  We even buried her with those beanie babies.  If I am ever at this point I really want a baby doll to love.  A couple of beanie babies would be a nice first step!dolls for dementia

Baby dolls for Alzheimer’s patients are therapeutic

A helpful, non-drug way to calm and soothe seniors with Alzheimer’s or dementia is to give them a soft, lifelike baby doll to cuddle. These therapy dolls can even be effective in calming older adults with severe agitation or other significant behavioral issues.

Why therapy dolls for dementia work

Therapy dolls help seniors feel useful and needed and give them something positive to focus on. Similar to the effect of soft toys like stuffed animals, hugging something soft helps someone with dementia soothe themselves.

Another reason therapy dolls are helpful is that they bring back happy memories of early parenthood for both women and men. Having a child to care for can also ease feelings of isolation and sadness. After all, most of us have seen or experienced the way that interacting with real babies can quickly lift spirits and calm nerves.

Many older adults will enjoy rocking and cuddling their doll. Some even adopt the baby as their own and make caring for it part of their daily routine.

Tips for introducing doll therapy to your senior

The best approach is to casually introduce the doll to your senior and let them decide if they like it or not. If they have no interest in the doll, don’t make an issue out of it. They may change their minds in the future so you could always give it another try in a few weeks or months.

A few tips:

  1. Don’t act like the doll is a doll, refer to it as a baby and treat it like a real child.
  2. Get a lifelike doll, but one that doesn’t cry – that could be upsetting.
  3. Don’t force it, allow your senior to get to know the doll slowly.

For a real-life example, click here to find out how one woman slowly introduced a lifelike doll to her mom and used it to ease her anxiety without making her feel stressed about being responsible for it. Try it out, see how your older adult responds, and be flexible.

Some caregivers find dolls controversial

We’ve heard from many caregivers who say their older adults are much calmer and happier now that they have their own baby doll. They’re relieved to have found a non-drug solution that eases their senior’s dementia symptoms.

Some people are concerned that giving their older adult a doll would be demeaning or patronizing. But when someone has dementia, helping them feel safe and happy in their current reality is the top priority. That’s why we sometimes need to consider unconventional approaches like baby dolls, fidget blankets, and other simple activities and toys.

Of course, the decision is entirely up to you since you know your older adult best. If you think a therapy doll might help them feel better and enjoy life more, why not give it a try? It’s an inexpensive “treatment” with no side effects.

By DailyCaring Editorial Team http://dailycaring.com

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Please come back next time when I’ll share more topics about dementia. If you want to get an email whenever I post a blog (I write about other things, not just Alzheimer’s) find the “FOLLOW” box which is usually to the right hand side somewhere, enter your email and respond when the confirmation email is sent to you.

If you are in need of prayer for yourself, in your role as a caregiver, or if you have any specific questions please send me a comment with whatever information you want to share or ask about. I’ll say again that I’m not expert, but I probably experienced with my mom a lot of things you’re going through and will try my best to help. If I don’t know the answer I will tell you I don’t know. I’ll never judge, I’ve been judged enough to last a life time and would never do that to someone else. My email address is rosalyn@selu.edu if that is an easier way to communicate.

Until next time,

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03.02.17 Some Things I Learned About Dementia – Not Exactly a Walk in the Park: A Peek into Life with Dementia/Alzheimer’s

I  found this on http://blog.thealzheimerssite.com. From experience, I can say this is very much what life in the world of dementia can be like.

Have you ever wondered what it would be like to havedementia? Maybe you’d like to be able to see the world through the eyes of someone you know who has Alzheimer’s to help you better understand and care for them. Or maybe you’re just passionately curious about the many unique perspectives this world has to offer, one of which is the viewpoint of a person with severe memory problems.

In the video below, you can step into the shoes of a woman with Alzheimer’s and go for a little walk.

One shocking thing we learned in the video is that the woman’s memory seems to fade and return (or vice versa) within seconds. One moment she is lucid and independent and decides to head home on her own by way of a short cut. The next moment, she turns the corner and is completely lost and terrified. Her physical reaction to the sudden memory loss is eye-opening.

Her comment at 2:20 is what really got us thinking about what it’s like to have Alzheimer’s.

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Please come back next time when I’ll share more topics about dementia.  If you want to receive an email whenever I post a blog (I write about other things, not just Alzheimer’s) find the “FOLLOW” box which is usually to the right hand side somewhere, enter your email and respond when the confirmation email is sent to you.

If you are in need of prayer for yourself, in your role as a caregiver, or if you have any specific questions please send me a comment with whatever information you want to share or ask about. I’ll say again that I’m not expert, but I probably experienced with my mom a lot of things you’re going through and will try my best to help. If I don’t know the answer I will tell you I don’t know. I’ll never judge, I’ve been judged enough to last a life time and would never do that to someone else. My email address is rosalyn@selu.edu if that is an easier way to communicate.

Until next time,

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02.01.17 Some Things I Learned About Dementia – 8 Things People with Dementia Wish You Wouldn’t Say original – reblogged 12.14.17

singleactofkindnessquoteameliaearhartThis article was found on http://blog.thealzheimerssite.com/.  There is lots of information about dementia there.  Check it out for yourself! I found this information to be quite true and helpful, I hope it will help you as well.

Speaking to or about an Alzheimer’s patient as if he or she is not really a person is a pitfall many of us fall into. When our parents and grandparents lose their memory and, often, certain aspects of their personalities, it’s hard to regard them as the same people we once knew. It’s also nearly impossible to keep from correcting someone who has Alzheimer’s; it’s just our nature to want to help “heal” our loved one’s memory by fixing the errors we hear in their words.

However, just because someone has Alzheimer’s doesn’t mean they don’t have feelings. So think twice before you make any of these comments that may unintentionally cause more harm than good to a person with Alzheimer’s.

8. “You said that already.”

You don’t really get how this disease works, do you?

medication blues

7. “Do you remember me?”

Way to put a person on the spot. Maybe I do and maybe I don’t. What’s it to you?

wrinkled face of senior woman

6. “Use your words.”

First of all, I’m not a three-year-old throwing a tantrum. I’m not refusing to use words. Sometimes I just CAN’T use words. If you know what I’m trying to say, why can’t you meet me halfway?

A grumpy old man

5. “No, no, I’m not Meredith.”

Are you sure you’re not Meredith? You look like Meredith. Mary, maybe? Marie? Emily? Can’t you just be Meredith for the day so I can be done guessing?

granportrait 12

Well then you tell the darn story. Am I not allowed to talk now just because I can’t keep my facts straight?

Old Man in Sunglasses

3. “Oh, actually, so-and-so passed away.”

Well thanks for raining down that giant tidal wave of grief on me in that blasted matter-of-fact tone. This is fantastic.

elderly woman

 2. “I know you probably don’t remember, but…”

Again, thank you. I’m glad we’ve gotten past that murky point where we weren’t sure what I remembered and what I didn’t. Just assuming I don’t know what you’re talking about is much easier.

Elderly woman sticking out her tongue

1. “So what have you been doing lately?”

Skydiving in Egypt. Making bombs in my bathtub. Learning to juggle maracas while doing a handstand on horseback. Come on. Seriously? I have no idea what I’ve been doing lately besides sitting in this chair watching daytime soaps. Can’t you think of anything more interesting to add to this conversation?

Loneliness

So basically, try not to make a person with Alzheimer’s feel like they’re on trial or like they can’t do anything right or like you don’t care what they say. If you’re wondering what you can say to a person with Alzheimer’s, we have a few tips. Because Alzheimer’s patients tend to remember feelings better than actual facts, it’s more important to have a conversation that makes the person feel good than one that is completely accurate. Avoid correcting what they say and focus on things they’re more likely to remember, usually the more distant past. Ask them about their childhood or early adulthood, when they met their spouse, what their children were like as little kids, etcetera. And just go with the flow when

they don’t make perfect sense.

This article originally appeared on ScottSlayton.net. 17

Please come back next time when I’ll share more topics about dementia from various sources. If you want to get an email whenever I post a blog (I write about other things, not just Dementia/Alzheimer’s) find the “FOLLOW” box which is usually to the right hand side somewhere, enter your email and respond when the confirmation email is sent to you.

If you are in need of prayer for yourself, in your role as a caregiver, or if you have any specific questions please send me a comment with whatever information you want to share or ask about. I’ll say again that I’m not expert, but I probably experienced with my mom a lot of things you’re going through and will try my best to help. If I don’t know the answer I will tell you I don’t know. I’ll never judge, I’ve been judged enough to last a life time and would never do that to someone else. My email address is rosalyn@selu.edu if that is an easier way to communicate.

Until next time,

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